Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

GENRESAnimation,Adventure,Comedy,Crime,Family,Fantasy,Mystery
LANGEnglish
ACTOR
Bob HoskinsChristopher LloydJoanna CassidyCharles Fleischer
DIRECTOR
Robert Zemeckis

SYNOPSICS

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) is a English movie. Robert Zemeckis has directed this movie. Bob Hoskins,Christopher Lloyd,Joanna Cassidy,Charles Fleischer are the starring of this movie. It was released in 1988. Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) is considered one of the best Animation,Adventure,Comedy,Crime,Family,Fantasy,Mystery movie in India and around the world.

'Toon star Roger is worried that his wife Jessica is playing pattycake with someone else, so the studio hires detective Eddie Valiant to snoop on her. But the stakes are quickly raised when Marvin Acme is found dead and Roger is the prime suspect. Groundbreaking interaction between the live and animated characters, and lots of references to classic animation.

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Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) Reviews

  • Nothing short of miraculous

    La Gremlin2001-03-02

    Stop and think about this movie for a minute, and you realize that we are unbelievably fortunate that it even exists. Think about all the different cartoon characters who have cameos here. Think about how their respective owners had to put aside decades of competing against each other for gags that would last a few seconds of screen time. Realise that, before this movie, the idea of combining fully rendered animated characters with live action footage was considered impossible. And how the hell do you market a movie that includes both murder plots and fuzzy little cartoons? This movie is a miracle. I absolutely loved it as a kid, and although parts of it flew over my head I really did not care. I did know that this is what animation can do when all the "rules" are totally ignored. And why shouldn't they be? Now, as an adult, I appreciate "Roger Rabbit" for its gutsyness. There is absolutely *nothing* like this anywhere. It gets a solid Ten.

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  • "Who framed Roger Rabbit" is a classic

    Smells_Like_Cheese2004-02-08

    I was a little surprised that "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" wasn't on the top 250. Almost everyone loves this film. It was a major breakthrough for movies. The cartoon world meets reality. Bob Haskins is to die for in this film, he plays such a great American detective and he didn't have much to work with. After all when he was talking to Roger, he wasn't really talking to anybody since it was a cartoon character. I love the way he develops his role so much, how he goes from this stick-to-the-book and all cartoons are bad to this lovable goofy guy due to Roger's insatiable love for life and cartoons. It's silly because it's a cartoon, but Roger and Bob clicked so well and are unforgettable. Christopher Lloyd... shudder! This guy gave me so many nightmares as a kid from his character as the judge. The ending where he reveals his true form, he is just terrifying and effective. Jessica Rabbit is so cool and sexy for a cartoon. She's just too much fun for this movie and is wonderful as a cartoon. "I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way". My favorite scene is without a doubt when Eddie(played by Bob) is looking for Jessica and meets the crazy look-a-like in Toon Town. Just great and hilarious. Come on, fans! This is a terrific movie and deserves to be on the top 250 films of all time! It's a break through for cinema history and movies in general. It's a great one! I'd highly recommend this for the family and friends or just a Saturday with nothing to do. 10/10

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  • One of the best of all time

    klaypariah2004-11-12

    When this original movie was conceived and released in 1988, it was seen as a movie for the kids, but it soon found its way into the hearts of moviegoers everywhere. This was a landmark movie, cementing skills from all areas of Hollywood, from the budding special effects industry, to the acting skills of Bob Hoskins, to the SUPERB directing skills of Robert Zemeckis, to create one of the most impressive movies in Hollywood. While this movie was not the first of it's kind, it was definitely the first to have cartoons and real actors interact so seamlessly, and it is impressive that it was made over 15 years ago. Another impressive part of this movie is the soundtrack, using the classic 20's jazz song "Why Don't You Do Right?" to bring back the old jazz club scene, to make for a truly authentic feel from a cartoon character, as well as the detective music used all originally composed. All around, this movie is one that I Grew up with, and children and adults will be enjoying for decades to come, because Who Framed Roger Rabbit will be a classic in the movie world for a long long time.

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  • Smile Darn Ya Smile

    Valeen_the_II2006-11-17

    This movie is excellent! It's funny, suspenseful,& witty. The leads, Roger & Eddie are likable in their own unique ways and the FX are breathtaking! Bob Hoskins & Chris Lloyd deserved Oscar nods IMO. WFRR is what most of today's CGI films "pretend" to be! A mature, family film that people of many generations can enjoy! Anyone who hasn't seen this film I definitely recommend it! If you like quirky comedies,fantasies, suspenseful films, or are a cartoon geek watch WFRR!... As a huge fan of all things comedic, I love the film's message about laughter! When the film opens, detective Eddie Valiant (Bob Hoskins) is this disenchanted, cynical alkie who hasn't gotten over the murder of his brother who was killed by a toon...Because of this Eddie[ who was once known for his penchant for solving toon-related cases, getting the colorful playful creatures out of trouble] resents ALL toons now and refuses to work for or with them. Too bad Roger Rabbit doesn't know this. He is a toon who is wanted for a murder he didn't commit and hounded by the creepy & corrupt judge/jury/executioner : Judge Doom. Thus he seeks Valiant's help. During their search for the true killer and their evasion of Judge Doom & his weasel cohorts, Eddie wonders how Roger can have such an exuberant clownlike spirit in the face of possible death. Roger tells Eddie "a laugh can be a very powerful thing, why sometimes in life it's the only weapon we have." The tone of the film is a mixture of dark noir frenetic tooniness a sultry yet strong damsel (the one and only Jessica Rabbit) and social racial allegory. The film's theme of minorities (the toons) vs. genocide & "the man" (Judge Doom)....And of Eddie's prejudices against toons (due to his brother's murder) disappearing at the end, thus he overcomes his alcoholism and grief or Roger's very motto of "Laughter is a powerful weapon" and how that helps Eddie in the final showdown (by killing the weasels with laughter and thwarting Judge Doom with a toon prop that malfunctions his diabolical machine). American Pop-culture & escapism ARE powerful weapons against misery, hatred & life's hardships in general. And they help unite all different walks of life. WFRR takes place in the WWII era towards the 50s...While the 40's were a time of American unity, escapism & pop-culture (what the "toons" represent) The 50's were more about cold hard, capitalism technology & being superior..I feel that the megalomaniac villain represents THAT as well as the racial/cultural insensitivity that came with the 50's. But no matter how you interpret WFRR it's an American masterpiece! There seems to be some controversy on what age it is appropriate for....Be warned this film IS violent loud climatic and more likely than not, will scare a young child. But if you are a parent you have to know your kid and realize what will give him or her nightmares. Having said that, even if you won't let junior watch it, that doesn't mean you, yourself can't enjoy it, the next time it comes on Encore Mystery. There are a lot of "Judge Dooms" these days...People who are perpetually serious & full of themselves & really have NO sense of humor at all...Don't be a Judge Doom...Watch this movie!

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  • Great fun for kids and adults alike.

    linkola2000-01-09

    I'm a fan of both cartoons and film noir movies, and so Who Framed Roger Rabbit was a great experience to me. Set in the 1940's, in a shadowy atmosphere reminiscent of Bogart classics such as The Maltese Falcon, the movie blends in cartoon characters and live actors almost seamlessly. For me, one of the most interesting aspects of the movie was seeing Disney and Warner Bros cartoon characters in the same scenes - for the first time in film history, I believe. Who could forget the piano duel of Donald and Daffy? The live actors were a bit theatrical and over-dramatic at times, but not to an extent that would have made the film unbearable or bad. The cartoon characters saved a lot, too. Fast-paced, entertaining film that can be viewed by anyone. I liked it very much.

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